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The last couple of weeks media, artists, organizations and “common people” have set the spotlight on the situation of 450 children living in Norway. Many of them are born in Norway while their parents seeked asylum and waited for an answer, some are born after their parents had got an abatement on their request.
Norway’s asylum politics got a tougher line during the last years, also to make it easier to send people out of the country when they got a final abatement on their asylum request. Some of the reason given for this it that people shouldn’t have to live illegal in a country without rights and money and to “make space” for people who really need protection…
Trapped in the middle between laws, papers and principles are around 450 children.
Many of them don’t know any other country than Norway. They’ve been born here, go to kindergartens and schools, have Norwegian as their language, celebrate the National Days as the days of their native country.
But because their parents or even their grandparents are refugees without the right to stay in Norway they’re supposed to be send out and to be returned to “their country of origin” or the European country their family got to as first on their escape from their native country. If you know a bit about the financial situation in Europe right now, you’ll see that to be returned to countries like Spain, Greece and Italy ain’t a “save thing”. We know about people who have been returned to those countries and are forced to life on the streets with their small children….
Others are supposed to be returned to their native countries like Ethiopia, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Somalia and more…
How on earth can Norwegian foreigners’ registration offices defend it to send out the families? They reason it with a small part of the asylum law.
It seems they are setting to side other laws and the UNs convention on the Rights of the Child in the process.
As the daughter and granddaughter of second world war refugees I’m personally touched when I read the stories of the children and their families. I know a bit about how to be refugee affects your life and your future, and the future of your children and generations to come…
And I’m scared when I read the contentions people give to actually send those children out. It’s important to look at each single case of course…
But can you actually say that a child born in Norway and lived here for years hasn’t the right to be here, ain’t “Norwegian enough” to stay in the country?
Norway with all its space and oil-fortune really should be the country in the world that can afford to reach out their hands and turn around in this cases…

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